Assisted Living Knoxville TN

Aging parents understand they need help but most want to keep a certain sense of independence. Assisted living is a great option that has the convenience and personnel staff of a nursing home but gives them the independence they desire. It’s more like a retirement community with benefits. Assisted living provides senior social activities and in-house medical attention. Please scroll down to learn more and get access to the local assisted living facilities in Knoxville, TN listed below.

Nhc Healthcare, Ft Sanders
(865) 525-4131
2120 Highland Ave
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing Home Services

Data Provided by:
Priority Healthcare Services of Tennessee, Inc.
(865) 584-4010
1700 Liberty Street
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided by:
NHC HealthCare Fort Sanders
(865) 525-4131
2120 Highland Ave
Knoxville, TN
Types of Care
Nursing Care

Data Provided by:
Fort Sanders TCU
(865) 541-1581
1901 Clinch Ave
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing Home Services

Data Provided by:
Respicare Home Medical
(423) 558-8787
4462 Western Avenue
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing homes, In home

Data Provided by:
Priority Healthcare Services of Tennesse
(865) 584-4010
1700 Liberty St
Knoxville, TN
Types of Care
Home Care

Data Provided by:
Galaxy Manor
(865) 524-3130
2711 Sheridan St
Knoxville, TN
Types of Care
Home for the Aged

Data Provided by:
Fort Sanders TCU
(865) 541-1581
1901 Clinch Ave
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing homes

Data Provided by:
CAC Office on Aging
(865) 524-2786
2247 Western Ave
Knoxville, TN
Types of Care
Senior Centers

Data Provided by:
Nhc Healthcare, Ft Sanders
(865) 525-4131
2120 Highland Ave
Knoxville, TN
Services
Nursing homes

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Assisted Living

Changing Seasons

By Paulette Kaufman

Have you looked at your mother lately? I mean, have you really looked at your mother lately? As a marketing counselor in a Continuous Care Retirement Community (CCRC) I have met many senior citizens and their families. It amazes me how many children continue to see their parents as the strong, in-charge person they were 30 years ago. They are accustomed to seeing their parents provide help and support; and truly fear seeing their mother or father struggling.

Recently, a couple from Delaware brought their father into our lifecare community to look at apartments in the independent living neighborhood. When I spoke to the son on the phone, I asked him how his father was managing at home. His reply was confident, "My Dad is fine, and does everything for himself." We set the appointment for later that week.

On the day of the appointment they arrived with Dad. I was concerned when I saw him. He was a tall, frail man, wearing a disheveled warm-up suit that looked like it needed washing. He could have also used a shave. However, when I reached for his hand to shake it, his bright blue eyes sparkled and he gave me a big smile, and a warm Hello.

As we walked down the hall to see an apartment the older gentleman pulled me aside and quietly confided, "I can't do this. My legs are too weak to walk this far." I knew he needed Assisted Living, where the rooms and distances are more manageable, and 24-hour personal care is available.

I turned to the son and explained the situation. As our parents age, sometimes they need extra care and assistance. Everyone wants their parents to live independently as long as possible, but the ability to make good decisions and to care for ones self can slowly decline. Then there may be a crisis, and the immediate and sometimes emergency need for the help of another caring adult becomes suddenly apparent.

We then toured the Assisted Living neighborhood of the community. When we finished, the older gentleman turned to me, smiled kindly and said, "This is more like it."

When the father went to use the restroom, his son looked at me and said, "I just had no idea he was so frail."

This scenario is a common experience that occurs as seasons change in the lives of those we love. The son always saw his dad as the strong father figure of years ago. After a bit of probing, some of my questions revealed signs he hadnt seen. He admitted that his Dad had lost some weight recently, and told me that on their last visit he noticed a few 'Meals on Wheels" boxes sitting in the refrigerator, unopened. It was difficult for this loving son to acknowledge that his father had aged and needed assistance with daily tasks. A tear came to the son's eyes as he realized he had been in denial, and that he wasnt helping his father in the right way. If you are wondering whether or not this experience could be yours, ask yourself the following questions, and you may quickly find the answer.

Is your par...

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